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Accessory Reviews Gear Reviews INNOVV Motorcycle Accessory & Parts Other Motorcycle Blogs review Web Bike World

INNOVV Power Hub 2: Early Release Review

Introduction

How time flies; it seems like it was only yesterday since we published our first look at the INNOVV Power Hub 1 product – I’ll blame it on cabin fever generated largely due to our lousy and continuing winter…

NNOVV Power Hub 2 - Smaller than Power Hub 1

But like the original Power Hub 1 reviewed in December 2016 to be exact, the newest iteration, now called the Power Hub 2 still provides five switched in-line fused outputs, but in a much smaller form factor – taking up about half the space needed for the original Power Hub 1.

And it is this ‘downsizing’ that is, at least for me, the biggest change to what is one of the most versatile and economical power output products on the market.

The INNOVV Power Hub 2

Welcome to 2019 and the INNOVV Power Hub 2. Unlike the Power Hub 1 that is a more 3-dimensional shape (think The Borg Cube), the Power Hub 2 is packaged in a smaller ‘brick’ form factor with identical dimensions to that of the INNOVV smart power supply module supplied with the C5 single and K2 dual channel camera systems.

NNOVV Power Hub 2 and K2 Power Supply

Comparatively, both Hub variants are totally sealed, including the flying lead cables used for input and outputs – features allowing the modules to be mounted and used externally or in a more protected or hidden unused spot on the host platform.

But the newer smaller Power Hub 2 is far more likely to fit into a wider variety of spaces, especially when footprint and clearance are paramount; the five output leads with ATM fuse modules occupy more space than the module itself…

NNOVV Power Hub 2 with coin for scale

wBW has tested, installed and used virtually everything power distribution and management system on the market over the years, be they large, small, switched or unswitched, wired or wireless managed; and, the INNOVV Power Hub products remain great representatives for their genre.

We truly are well served regarding power distribution products for motorcycles. However, in comparing many competitive products, the INNOVV pieces still stand out, not only for their simplicity and flexibility but also pricing.

Power Hub 2 Features

NNOVV Power Hub 2 layout, inputs left and outputs right
At almost half the size of the original, the down-sized Power Hub 2 still features three input leads and five output leads – all with individual in-line ATM fuse modules. The two LED display found on the Power Hub 1 is now represented by a single small Blue status LED on the Power Hub 2.

NNOVV Power Hub 2 features information on box

Power Hub Comparison Table

 

Feature Power Hub 1 Power Hub 2
Dimensions 64.2 x 39 x 40mm (2.5 x 1.5 x 1.6in) 46.2 x 31 x 18mm (1.8 x 1.2 x 0.7in)
Input Leads Pos (fused), Neg, Ignition trigger Pos (fused), Neg, Ignition trigger
Rated 40A maximum 20A maximum
Output Leads 5 x 5A fused flying leads (15A max) 5 x 3A fused flying leads (5A max)
Boot Delay 10 second On and Off 10 second On and Off
LEDs Red = Fault, Blue = Flashing on/off and Steady for power good Blue = Flashing on/off, Steady for power good

Power Hub 2 Leads & Lengths

  • Yellow = ignition (trigger) – connected to ignition switched power source, sends electrical signal to trigger the Power Hub to turn on and activate the five output circuits (115cm/45in)
  • Red = positive power lead input connected to positive terminal of battery, ATM fused (100cm/39in)
  • Black = ground lead input connected to negative terminal of battery (100cm/39in)
  • 5 x Red power output leads, with ATM in-line fuses (57cm/22in)
  • 1 x Black common ground for connected accessories (33cm/13in)

Installation

NNOVV Power Hub 2 installation instructions on box

As the Power Hub 2 is so small and totally sealed with input and output connections done using the flying leads the module is mountable almost anywhere, making it such a simple solution for virtually any powersports platform, especially motorcycles.

Since its release, I have installed many Power Hub 1 modules in a variety of motorcycles (sports, touring, adventure and scooters) with a suitable spot always found, although sometimes it took a bit of scoping and creative mounting to get it installed in the best location.

Not so for the Power Hub 2 – it is proving to be much easier to find a good spot or spots on the exterior or interior in which to mount it and with its long input and output leads routed, there aren’t a lot of limits to just where and how the system can be installed.

NNOVV Power Hub 2 output leads
NNOVV Power Hub 2 module on exterior
Being in the middle of cabin fever mitigation activities – otherwise known as winter period accessorizing, the arrival of the Power Hub 2 was timely as some additional unswitched power was needed for some additional USB outlets, handguard LEDs and rear-facing auxiliary lighting.

NNOVV Power Hub 2 installation

An initial outer side wall installation of the module was done on the 2019 F850GSAdv for assessment but was then moved over to the 2018 R1200GS Rallye where it had a temporary home and now a (permanent) location.

On both the F850GSA and the R1200GS, the module was initially mounted on the right outer sidewall of the under-seat housing before being moved to its permanent home under the back deck and just to the right of OE DWA (Alarm) module.

NNOVV Power Hub 2 installation, module closeup
All the locations work fine, although with different fastener material used for fixing the lightweight module in place. The external mountings use 3M VHB adhesive strips while the under-deck placement is more than adequate using low profile 3M Dual-Lock pieces, so the module can be lifted out of the way easily – the deck area is crowded…

NNOVV Power Hub 2 full deck view of installation
While the Red and Black power leads, housed in a length of Flexo F6, run up to or forward (depending on the motorcycle) to the battery box, the Yellow trigger wire has a couple of connection options.

NNOVV Power Hub 2 installation under deck

All the home fleet motorcycles see a lot of accessory ‘test mule’ activity, so extension leads via Posi-Tap pieces from the Brake, Left and Right Turn Signal and License Plate Light leads are installed and run to a six terminal common connection (barrier) strip to facilitate ongoing access and eliminate repeated access to the thin OE wiring.

The remaining two terminals are used for 12V switched power sources with a separately dedicated ground block mounted under the deck as well.

So, the ignition switched yellow trigger wire can go to the nearby Posi-Tap on the 7.5A 12V switched lead of the 10A/7.5A dual accessory circuit module located to the right under the rider’s seat section or to the terminal block hosting the license plate extension lead.

With the ‘input’ side of things taken care of, the one, it is time to utilize the five output leads with their ATM in-line fuse pieces to get things wired up. I typically mark the circuits one through five for documented use identification.

NNOVV Power Hub 2 installation, waterproof Posi-Locks

Two of the output leads run forward along the right wall, joining up to their respective accessory leads using waterproof Posi-Locks. A third output, also with a waterproof connector, routes behind the OE alarm module as 12V switched power to the Admore Lighting ADMSB Smart-Brake light bar (these are among the first accessories installed on all home fleet motorcycles).

The remaining two output circuits, with fuses removed (bagged, with spares and secured in an accessible spot) are sealed off, wrapped up and tucked away between the DWA and RDC modules – but fishable from the deck cutout.

Function & Performance

NNOVV Power Hub 2 Blue LED indicator light

Turn on the ignition and wait 10 seconds – when the (visible or not) Blue LED lights up the Power Hub 2 is up and running along with connected accessories. Turning the ignition off sees another 10-second delay (along with any onboard system delay), then the PH2 shuts down.

Performance, including reliability, is easy to assess…none of the (many) original Power Hub 1 units I have installed nor either of the two newer Power Hub 2 systems has ever shown any sign of weakness or failure.

Conclusion

NNOVV Power Hub 2 module installed with deck reinstalled

INNOVV has stayed the course regarding general features of both the original Power Hub 1 and now the new Power Hub 2; the biggest visual takeaway regards the difference in overall size between the two.

Capacity and output are downsized – from 40A to 20A, with the expected reduction in recommended individual circuit maximums, from 15A to 5A (Hub 1 and Hub 2 respectively).

This could raise concerns over limitations, but as (most) of the accessories in use between four different motorcycles typically draw 0.5A to 4A tops (another benefit of using LED lighting) this reduction isn’t a major concern, although it needs to be considered.

And multiple circuits could be ‘ganged’ together for heavier duty demands, like the previously mentioned heated gear.

A small nit – there is (still) no choice between switched and unswitched output as many other products offer; once the 10-second bootup step is completed, all the circuits, properly fused, are available for use.

An observation made in the Power Hub 1 review over the 10-second boot and shut down delay is possibly still applicable here, although it doesn’t seem to have arisen as a major issue for users.

But it would still be great to see a time-delay shutdown provided if the motor is not actually started within a specific time…

Our bottom line from the original Power Hub 1 review bears reuse, although updated to reflect the new product; “the INNOVV Power Hub 2 is cost-effective with a list price of $69.00 and is a near perfect small form factor solution for adding multiple accessories where a rugged hands-off operating environment is key.”

Pros

  • Very small simple module
  • Simple battery and trigger lead connections
  • Five fused switched output circuits (3A nominal, 5A maximum)
  • Totally sealed module and leads
  • Long leads facilitate installation
  • Installable almost anywhere desired
  • Price

Cons

  • Hard plastic ATM fuse modules are (very) hard to open
  • No switched/unswitched output option

 

Specs

  • Manufacturer: INNOVV
  • Price: $69.00 USD
  • Made In: China
  • Alternative Models: The original Power Hub 1
  • Sizes: Small, ~50% smaller than the Power Hub 1
  • Review Date: February 2019

INNOV Power Hub 2 Image Gallery

The post INNOVV Power Hub 2: Early Release Review appeared first on Web Bike World.

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Dashcam Gear Reviews Motorcycle Accessory & Parts Other Motorcycle Blogs review Web Bike World

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam Installation & Review

Dashcams are becoming more and more popular in cars and trucks in recent years and not without good reason. With costs of vehicle repairs and associated injuries always on the rise, having a video of an incident might provide crucial evidence in determining fault in the event of a crash.

Finding dashcams for a car or truck is rather easy with a lot of choices available at various price points. Motorcycle camera systems, however, are much fewer in number. This is likely due to two factors:

  1. Motorcycles require more durable systems that can cope with the elements as at least some parts, the cameras, for instance, will be exposed to the great outdoors.
  2. Motorcycles are greatly outnumbered by cars and trucks (in the United States anyway) making the potential market for motorcycle specific devices much smaller.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam full contents for installation

These factors have lead to very few systems available that will work for the motorcyclist. There are several inexpensive systems on eBay and Amazon that hover around the $100.00 (USD) mark and then there are systems such as the Innovv K1 that run over $250.00 which we reviewed back in 2015. (The new Innovv K3 system currently available runs over $330.00!)

While I haven’t handled the very inexpensive systems the price makes me wonder about their quality to the point where I wouldn’t be willing to risk time and money on them. Recently, a thread on the popular adventure riding website Adventure Rider popped up with someone mentioning a new system he just purchased called the Halocam M1. This system cost under $200.00 and his opinion was that the system performed well considering the price.

Of course, I had to find out for myself what this system was all about. Let’s all have a look.

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The HaloCam M1

After learning about the HaloCam M1 I reached out to our editor at wBW and asked if he would be interested in a review. He was very interested and gave me the green light to order the system. I mention this because less than two weeks after I placed my order he contacted me letting me know that the HaloCam rep reached out to him to see if we wanted to review the system.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam lenses

Obviously, we told them that we already had begun the process but thanks for the offer. Frankly, in a case where we have a lesser-known vendor, I prefer the maker not to be aware the unit is being purchased for review so that I can be assured I’m getting the same experience as any other consumer.

Presentation is Everything

Once I received my box from Amazon containing the HaloCam system and opened it, I was impressed. Not by the camera system but just by the box itself. Instead of the plain white box I expected, the system came in a nice looking brown box with some nice printing and design on it.

Opening the box presented me with a white foam interior cut to fit the major parts of the system. Everything had its place and was well packed in a thoughtful design. Their marketing team certainly wanted to make a nice impression and it worked. Looks aren’t everything and despite the adage “presentation is everything” – results are much more important than a pretty box. Before we get to the results though, let’s see what’s in that box.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam packaging

What’s in the Box

The contents of the packaging provide pretty much everything required to completely install the system (few more zip ties would have been nice). However, zip ties notwithstanding, the system is comprehensive. Here’s the rundown:

  • The DVR Module
  • (2) Cameras
  • A remote switch
  • A GPS antennae
  • Camera mounting brackets (with screws)
  • The power supply module
  • (3) Extension cables
  • A USB power supply adapter
  • A magnetic mount for the DVR module
  • 3M dual lock fastener pad
  • A rubber cover for the DVR module
  • A printed quick start guide

The DVR module is a compact unit measuring 3.5x 2 x.3 inches (89x 51 x 8mm) and, despite the advertising photos, has a blue casing instead of black. The unit is also very lightweight though it’s hard to quantify since the connection cable “pigtails” is permanently attached. Suffice to say it’s not the most sturdy feeling device.

On the DVR unit is a 2.75 inch (70mm) screen for viewing live and recorded video as well as menus for device setup. The top edge has a single button to power on the DVR module. On the long lower edge are four buttons for navigating the menus as well as a MicroSD card slot.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam side view of control buttons

The slot is actually labeled TF which refers to the TF Card standard but the term is now considered interchangeable so Micro SD cards will work fine. As always I would recommend a card from a major manufacturer with a good reputation for best results and durability.

On the subject of durability, it’s evident via a cursory examination that the device is not waterproof or even resistant. A “waterproof” rubber sleeve is included with the device but since one side is almost entirely open it is best to assume it will help reduce shock and vibration and a little bit of water resistance. As such it is best to find a reasonably well-protected location for installation of the DVR module.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam wire connectors

Cameras, power, and control switch connections use keyed connectors so they can only be installed the “correct” way. The camera and switch connections are (fortunately) all cross compatible so if one should accidentally run the “front” connection cable to the “rear” camera, it will still work just fine. I’ll demonstrate this in the installation section in a minute.

The camera units are a little larger and heavier than I expected but they have large coated glass elements which are a good sign for creating contrasty video footage. Also, the weight suggests a pretty solid metal housing which is warranted considering the durability required for long life being attached to a motorcycle.

The advertising for the HaloCam M1 claims that these are Sony lenses and Sony sensors. I can give the benefit of the doubt on the sensor side of things as I can’t take them apart but the lenses, I have doubts. The omission of “Sony Lens” and focal length printed on the front is very unusual for a product from Sony and most any major camera/lens manufacturer.

Now let’s see how all the pieces come together and install on my Ninja 1000.

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Installation

Installation is not complicated but it can take some time. In my case, I wanted to avoid cutting or drilling any plastics on my bike. At the same time, I wanted to have a relatively “clean” installation so I spent almost as much time planning as I did the actual installation.

Before We Begin

Something important I want to point out is that the Green connector on the DVR is for the front camera and the Black one is for the rear. I want to save others the trouble of trying to figure this out as it is NOT called out in the meager instructions. I found this after some trial and error. I didn’t know at the time but there is an image (shown below) on the Amazon product page that calls all the parts out.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam full component diagram

Where to Start

Since every bike is different I’m not going to go into too much installation detail here (thank goodness, right?) and instead we’ll just take a high-level view. The main things to consider are locations for cameras, the DVR, GPS module, and lock button. Also, power needs to be considered.

Powering Up

I’ll start with the last point first. The power supply module should be connected to a switched power source such as running lights or other “ignition on” source. I already have an Eastern Beaver fuse panel installed under the seat of my bike so I have switched power already available.

I mention all this because the advert on Amazon states “Constant Power Supply & Connect then forget”. This isn’t very clear but it could be taken to mean just connect to a constant power supply like the battery. Do not do this as the system will remain on all the time until it runs the battery down.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam installation process

The HaloCam M1 comes with a USB power connector which allows one to power up the system away from the bike. This was very handy for doing the initial set up inside at the table using just a USB power bank.

There was an initial concern on my part about how the system would be able to gracefully stop recording once the ignition is turned off. This seemed to me like it could cause corrupt files but it turns out there is an internal rechargeable battery that can provide the unit with power to run for several minutes (or more?) after the power has been turned off so files are saved properly once the bike is turned off and the unit shuts down a few seconds later.

Spot for the DVR

After getting the power sorted, the next step should be to find a suitable location for the DVR unit. Since it is not waterproof I would recommend a location that is well protected such as under a seat or other storage compartment. In my case, I placed the unit under my passenger seat.

Placing the Cameras

Next, place the cameras. I wanted to put the cameras in unobtrusive locations that also offered a decent view. The rear was easy enough on my bike as I just attached it under the top case rack. This offered a good view of the rear which, while it does cut off some of the tops of the view, provides more than enough view to do the job as a “dashcam”.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam installed Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam installed

The front was a little more difficult as I couldn’t find a place I felt good about. Right under the fairing nose posed the possibility of the camera contacting the front fender over a big bump and there weren’t other places I liked. Eventually, I attached it to the side of the front fender. This location does have a portion of the fender blocking some of the right side views but still offers enough view to do the job of “dashcam”.

I didn’t want to drill holes in the plastics to attach the brackets for the cameras with the included screws so I used Scotch Extreme Mounting tape to attach the brackets to the bike. This tape has worked very well for me on other projects and has held the cameras in place for weeks now in the summer heat with no issues. *Your “mileage” may vary so if that stuff doesn’t work for you please don’t come after me :).

Motorcycle subframe

GPS Antenna

With the cameras and DVR in place, the last piece of the puzzle was to find a good spot for the GPS antenna. Since I had removed some of the rear plastics around the subframe during the wire routing planning, I found a good spot on the left side of the subframe which will be covered by the plastics once they are re-installed.

The thin plastic shouldn’t cause an issue with the GPS reception and since the unit was able to locate satellites from inside our house during initial testing I felt pretty good about this.

Potential “Gotchas”

While I was planning my wire routing I found there were several routing options that were not compatible due to the relatively large size of the waterproof connectors for the extension cables.

Some areas that might have been large enough to allow the cable to pass through discreetly were much too small to get these larger connectors to pass through. In some cases, removal of more parts from the bike could have made this work but the return on time investment didn’t seem worth it to me.

The other thing to be aware of is that the small metal brackets for the cameras are not that robust and in the kit I received, the loop portion of the bracket that encircles the cameras were too large to securely keep the cameras properly positioned.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam brackets

That isn’t to say the cameras would fall out but they were too loose to maintain their correct rotational position allowing them to twist in the mount. This was a pretty easy fix using a very small strip of tape on the interior of the metal band. Once in place, the bracket could be tightened down enough to hold the camera firmly in position.

One last thing to keep in mind is that the extension cables are quite long and a bit thick. Since they contain several conductors (wires) they are not easily cut and spliced. As such I ended up with a lot of excess wire to bundle up and “store” under the seat. I had sufficient space to tuck this wire bundle on my Ninja 1000 but not every bike will have space like this so be sure to include room for this in your installation if you want to have a “neat” final installation.

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In Use

Once installed and underway, the system is automatic. Recording starts a few seconds after the ignition is turned on and shuts down a few seconds after being turned off. It really couldn’t be easier.

Setting up the options is fairly straightforward. Resolution can be set for 720p or 1080p and if using the 1080p setting, a high-speed card is recommended as two 7mbps video streams are being captured at the same time.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam control screen

Settings can be adjusted through the phone app (Android or iPhone) over Wi-Fi. The DVR unit acts as the access point so one will need to connect their device to the Wi-Fi specs called out in the manual. The Wi-Fi settings can be adjusted if desired.

Control Button

The included control button allows one to capture a 15 second “Wonderful Video” and a photo by pressing the button briefly. Holding it down for a long press (more than one second?) will lock the video preventing it from being overwritten. Depending on the size of the SD card, this might be unnecessary but it can be done nonetheless.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam control button

Just to be clear, “Wonderful Videos” are simply video clips that start from 5 seconds before you press the button and then run for a total of fifteen seconds from that point. This doesn’t appear to interfere with regular recording but rather it just “clips” this segment and saves a copy to the Wonderful Video folder on the card. These videos come from only the front camera and are really for the convenience of finding that brief moment of desired footage later.

Accessing Your Video Clips

One of the settings is the clip length with the shortest being one minute and the longest, five. I chose the five-minute clip length simply as it makes fewer files. Keep in mind this is just the length of each clip that is recorded. They are continually recorded and “stack” upon the card until it is full, then the oldest files are overwritten as a new video is captured.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam recordings Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam recordings Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam recordings

The menu system on the DVR module is pretty easy to sort out and it can be used to view the live video as well as recorded clips and still photos. The phone app includes the same access to settings and offers a more robust interface for viewing photos and videos.

There is also the option of signing into the HaloCam sharing service where one can upload their videos. The sharing function has an easy to use editor allowing one to trim the video, remove the audio, and even choose some music from some included options. The videos are shared with their server and can also be sent to Facebook, Twitter, Wechat, and Moments. Strangely there is no YouTube option.

Where Was I?

The HaloCam M1 comes with a GPS antenna but how exactly to access the GPS data was a bit of a mystery. As I stated earlier in the review, the included instructions are rather brief. Fortunately, the support from the vendor was very quick to respond.

While they were quick to respond, the actual instructions were a bit vague and consisted of a series of screenshots from the phone app. After following along I understood that one has to connect their phone to the DVR unit via the DVR Wi-Fi. Then, the data gets synchronized to the phone.

Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam GPS feature Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam mileage tracker

After the synchronization, one has to switch back the phone back to their cellular or Wi-Fi internet connection and then upload the data to the HaloCam server. After this step one can view the GPS data.

Historical GPS data can be viewed by date on the phone app but be sure you are not connected to the DVR unit or it will not show. It’s a bit counterintuitive but I was able to view the routes I took on the days when the system was running. Furthermore, there is a small “speed” icon that allows one to see various mph data along the route. The only thing I would like to see is a way to download the GPS data to a computer.

Video Quality

Video quality from the system is a mixed bag that leans more toward utility than “pretty”. For the mission of this camera system, I think that is just fine. The footage from both front and rear cameras is certainly sharp and contrasty making it easy to decipher details like license plate characters and street signs.

[Insert Video Sample Here]

Colors are a bit flat and the wide angle optics induce the expected distortion typical of the breed. The effects of rolling shutter can be seen as well indicating the slow readout speed of the CMOS sensors used in these cameras.

All that may sound harsh, and it would be if I was expecting GoPro levels of image quality. Instead, I am happy to give up some aspects of the quality of the footage in order to get those important details that could be necessary for the event of a crash. Law enforcement (if it comes to it) isn’t going to be concerned about the precision color of the footage.

About Law Enforcement

It’s important to note that the legal use of dashcam’s and similar devices for judging fault in the event of a crash will likely vary from state to state (or country to country). I highly recommend one research the proper use regulation of these devices for their local area before relying on them as legal evidence.

Conclusion

In the end, the Halocam performs adequately. The video footage is good enough to provide clear enough details for recording events happening in front and behind the motorcycle. While the video isn’t going to win any awards for color and exposure, it looks pretty good.

Like the video footage, the interface on the DVR as well as that in the phone application does the job but isn’t particularly intuitive. The email support is quick enough but trial and error may likely be part of the recipe for learning the ropes of using the Halocam M1.

Motorcycle subframe

As far as the build quality and durability of the DVR unit, it has held up well so far but the unit is so lightweight it doesn’t instill confidence that it will take a lot of punishment. Obviously, the device should be placed in a “safe place” on the bike but motorcycles make a lot of vibration and are subject to varying weather conditions. Time will tell how long it will hold up.

Pros

  • Small and lightweight DVR module
  • Video quality good for the intended purpose
  • Well packaged
  • Price is reasonable for the quality of video footage

Cons

  • Camera cables are a little bulky
  • DVR module feels “cheap” and doesn’t inspire confidence in long-term durability
  • Instructions are very basic, some experimentation required to sort out settings
  • Included brackets needed a little “adjustment”

Specs

  • Manufacturer: AiDrive
  • Price (When Tested): $179.89 (USD)
  • Made In: China
  • Review Date: November 2018

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Competitive pricing

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Halocam M1 Image Gallery

The post Halocam M1 Motorcycle Dashcam Installation & Review appeared first on Web Bike World.

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Cardo Systems Gear Reviews Motorcycle Accessory & Parts Motorcycle Intercom Reviews Other Motorcycle Blogs review Web Bike World

Cardo Packtalk Radios Bold and Slim Review Copy

A Great Experience with Packtalk Bold and Packtalk SlimCardo Packtalk Slim in box

Earlier this year I was offered the opportunity to test the Cardo Packtalk radio system. To be honest, I had never used a radio or communication system when riding and never really felt like I needed to get one. I have always liked the solitude that is found inside my helmet and communication with fellow riders was easy enough with a few basic hand signals. But when the opportunity arose, I thought that this would be a really good chance to review the Packtalk system from the point of view of a total newbie to helmet radios.

I’m not super tech savvy, I’m comfortable with technology but by no means do I own all the newest gadgets and I am not coming into this test process with any preconceived ideas or expectations. My hope is that my finding will speak to all of the riders who are looking at a first radio system as well as those who might be looking to upgrade.

Right from the start, I was very impressed by the Cardo line. I received a Cardo Packtalk Bold Duo and a Cardo Packtalk Slim Duo. Both sets arrived in perfect condition. The box is very well designed as it presents the individual components of the system very clearly.

In most cases, the quality of the packaging is often a good indication of the quality of the product and that is certainly true of the Cardo Packtalk radios. In addition, the box is a great way to store the unit or to keep spare parts as there are options accessories that you can purchase for the system.

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Pricing

The Packtalk Bold is available on the Cardo website as a single unit for $329.95 US or as a duo for $579.95 US. The Packtalk Slim has a list price of $329.95 for a single unit. Shipping and sales tax are additional and those fees can be determined once you have placed the item in your shopping cart. The Cardo site accepts Visa, Mastercard, American Express and PayPal.

Revzilla also sells both the Packtalk Bold Duo and the Packtalk Slim Duo. Revzilla offers free shipping on orders over $39.95 within the contiguous U.S. as well as a rewards program for most purchases.

Cardo Packtalk Features

Before getting into the specifics of each unit, I wanted to cover some of the general features and benefits of all of the Cardo Packtalk radios. It is also important to note that the technology and the features of the Packtalk Bold and the Packtalk Slim are identical.

One of the best features of these radios is that they offer Dynamic Mesh Communications (DMC). This is a fairly technical advance over other wireless communication systems, but in simple terms, it means that groups can self-form and self-heal.

DMC Application

The application of this is when riders coming into range with other members of their group they automatically join the group. And when riders leave the range of other members they automatically leave the group.

An additional feature is that multiple small subgroups can be functioning independently and then blend into one large group as the smaller subgroups come into range. In the case of the Cardo Packtalk radios, up to 15 riders can connect in the same group. In addition to offering DMC technology, the Packtalk also offers Bluetooth so you can connect to any headset.

Voice Activation

Another major step forward for the Packtalk system is the hands-free operation function. This is the same convenience that is offered by Siri, Alexa and numerous other electronics that consumers have embraced for their homes as well as navigation and other features integrated into a smartphone.

A simple “Hey Cardo” and you have the ability to control all of the critical features as well as the entertainment features of the Packtalk without every removing a hand from your bike. This not only offers additional safety but it can eliminate a lot of frustration as you begin to familiarize yourself with the control surfaces on the Packtalks.

Bells and Whistles

The range of the Packtalks is about one mile under perfect conditions but in average conditions, the range is still close to two-thirds of a mile which is almost double most radio systems on the market.

In addition to the two-way radio feature, the Packtalks also offer the ability to access FM radio, listen to music from a smartphone, share the audio you are listening to with the group, make phone calls, merge a call to the intercom and create a private chat.

The Palktalks also offer a great battery as they are estimated to provide up to 13 hours of talk time and can also be charged while they are in use via a 12-volt charger or a battery pack. And all of these features can be enjoyed rain or shine as all Cardo units are waterproof and offer a 2-year warranty.

The Cardo Packtalk Bold

Cardo Packtalk Bold units charging

I selected the Packtalk Bold set to install in my helmet and my husband’s helmet as we wear Shoei. A complete hard copy of installation guide, the user’s manual and a pocket guide are all included in the box which is very nice. Too many manufacturers are assuming that everyone has access to the Internet to view instructions and installation guides but not Cardo.

All three of these documents are available on the website, Cardo Systems, for future reference.

What’s In The Box

Cardo does a great job of making sure that you have everything that you will need to get your Packtalk radio installed and working perfectly. The box really does include everything that you will need down to the alcohol wipes to ensure that the helmet surface is clean and ready for the installation.

In the box you will find:

  • Noise canceling microphone
  • Hybrid microphone
  • Two speakers
  • Release tab
  • Corded microphone
  • Replacement microphone sponges
  • Pre-moistened alcohol pads
  • Speaker booster pads
  • Velcro pads
  • Hybrid mic clip
  • Glue plate

Installation

You have two options when you are installing the Packtalk Bold. The first choice is to use the metal clip which is inserted between the helmet’s outer shell and inner padding. The second choice is to use the glue plate to mount the unit on the side of the helmet.

The metal clip method worked very well on both Shoei helmets and due to the heat in the Phoenix area, we decided that was a better choice for long-term mounting rather than glue.

Cardo Radio Metal Clip Installation

The Shoei helmets have fully removable padding and cutouts are already in place to mount the speakers. It was a very simple process to remove the pads and then follow the installation instructions provided by Cardo. You can invest as much time as you feel is appropriate when it comes to carefully routing and concealing the wiring. We only spent a few extra minutes on the wiring but it was worth it to have really no visible wires once the installation was completed.

I don’t want to bore anyone with a detailed step by step on the radio installation because the Cardo instructions clearly take you through the process and this article is about evaluating the features and functions once the radios are installed. But I will note that overall the installation was much easier than I had anticipated. The written instructions and diagrams are very clear, making it a pretty painless process which is not at all what I was expecting. T

he one benefit that I had was that I was familiar with removing the pads from my helmet to wash them. So if you are not sure about the pad removal process for your specific helmet, you might want to watch a video of the process online so that you do not inadvertently damage your helmet.

Pairing and Functions

The Cardo mobile app is offered on the Apple App Store and on Google Play. I downloaded the app from Apple while my husband used Google. Neither of us has brand new phones but we had absolutely no issues downloading or operating the Cardo app. And pairing the units is as simple as using any Bluetooth speaker.

The Packtalk Bold operates on a three button system and also a control wheel toward the back of the unit. I did notice that it took me some time to consistently be able to push the control wheel without it turning, but as it turned out I didn’t use that function very often. And knowing about the voice control feature of the Packtalk made me even less concerned about certain button features.

But I did want to be thorough in my evaluation so I pulled out several different types of gloves to test them out. With a pair of gauntlet gloves, which have a fairly thick leather fingertip, I was able to feel the buttons very easily and had no issues with function.

Next, I moved to a thicker textile glove with some Thinsulate on the fingers and that functioned equally as well. The final pair of gloves was a true winter-weight leather glove with a thick lining. This glove made the function a bit more challenging, but I was still able to feel the defined ridge of each button.

I am fairly certain that with more frequent use and familiarity with the buttons, any rider would be comfortable using the Packtalk Bold even in winter weight gloves.

Voice Commands

My concern with the button function became less of an issue as I grew more familiar with the voice command function of the Packtalk Bold. The key phrase for the unit is “Hey Cardo” just as with Google or Siri.

Any time that the unit is on you can use the voice commands to access the radio, play music, adjust the volume or mute the audio. In addition, you can speed dial, redial, answer or ignore phone calls.

And one of the most functional features is the ability to check your battery status. “Hey Cardo, battery status” and you know that you are good to go on the power of that you need to take a break and uses the charge on the go feature to top off your battery.

Shopping Now? We Recommend:

webBikeWorld has worked closely with RevZilla over the years to provide our testers with products to review. In addition to being a great site to shop from, they’re also a great partner.

RevZilla

Free shipping on orders over $40
30-day no-nonsense return policy
Excellent selection of all major brands
Awesome pricing

Buy This Helmet on RevZilla

Amazon

Free shipping (with Amazon Prime)
30-day return policy
Excellent selection
Competitive pricing

Buy This Helmet on Amazon

First Test Ride

I wasn’t really sure what to expect for my first ride with a radio in my helmet, but I quickly learned that I really like the ability to speak to the person I am riding with. But I also learned that we both have a tendency to comment on the driving skills of some of the motorist around us. So I needed to remember that what I used to mumble sometimes not so quietly to myself was now being tossed into my husband’s helmet and vice versa.

On surface streets, the sound was far better than I expected. We were never far enough apart to lose the connection even at a range of about half a mile.

Moving onto the highway we were still able to carry on a conversation or to make short comments without any difficulty hearing or understanding each other. At a higher rate of speed, the wind noise was a bit more noticeable. I found that opening and closing the top vent on my helmet had no real impact on the sound quality but opening the vent on the front of my helmet did decrease the quality of my transmissions.

Another factor to consider is that we tested the Packtalks in Phoenix in the summertime so we did not have the chin curtain installed in either helmet. That would eliminate some of the air-flow sounds and increase the sound quality a bit I am guessing. That being said, the quality of the helmet is going to have an impact on the sound quality of the Packtalk system. A helmet that is engineered to be quieter will obviously have better sound quality for those whom you are speaking to and will allow you to hear the speakers more clearly as well. So take that into consideration when creating your expectations for the Packtalk and when evaluating the performance of your system.

Overall, I was very happy with the quality of the sound and the function of the Packtalk Bold Duo in our first ride. Being new to the concept, we were only barely scratching the surface of what these radios offer by using the two-way radios but we were very happy with that first step.

A Second Test

On the second test ride, we were meeting 2 other riders who had installed the Packtalk Slim Duo. The units had all been installed and established in the pack prior to the ride so that we could just randomly meet up. One feature that is great about the Packtalk is that two different groups from the same pack can be communicating and then merge into a single group as they enter range with one another. So in our case, each couple could be talking and then we were able to all hear each other as we came into range.

We were on a highway and had decent vision so we could see the other two riders as we approached. At somewhere around half a mile or a little more, our two groups merged into a single group and we could all talk. After the ride, as the other couple split off, we returned to the two separate groups once we were around a mile apart.

During the test ride, one person made a phone call and then rejoined the group with no issues. We also had one member use the speed dial voice command to call another member of the group. With both people on the call in helmets and at high speed the sound quality was a little low but still very functional and understandable.

Additional Insights

In addition to riding in groups, I have used the Packtalk Bold on a lot of rides when I was by myself to test the other features such as the radio and music playback from my phone. The only issue that I have come across has been related to the location of my phone during the ride. Having my phone in my back pocket caused a lot of connectivity issues in the music and in “dropped” calls.

After discovering this issue, I began carrying my phone in either the inside front pocket of my jacket or in a top zipper compartment of my backpack. In both cases, the phone is about one or two feet from my helmet and the function has been perfect.

Apparently, the density of my butt was the issue for the Bluetooth, not the distance so a jacket pocket, front coat pocket or having the phone mounted on the handlebar of your bike would all maintain the 2ish foot distance that works perfectly.

Update: the latest firmware (4.2) has resolved this issue.

Having made some longer rides in groups of four or more without any type of radio, I am very certain that I would much rather have the Cardo Packtalk system for my next long ride. It just makes it very simple to communicate things like a slight change in route or a need for fuel. In addition, having the ability to communicate at a distance greater than a line of sight or half a mile is a great safety feature in the event of an accident or other equipment issues.

The functions offered by the Packtalk Bold and the Packtalk Slim are huge and range from very functional for communication purposes to very much luxuries such as listening to the radio or stored music. And the best part by far is that both of these benefits are integrated into a single, easy to use system. Having spent just weeks exploring the bells and whistles of the new Packtalk radios, I am more convinced than ever that it would take many more months to fully put these radios through their paces and become intimate with the function and features that they offer.

Originally I would have been against having radios because I like to put on my helmet and not hear a phone, radio or other voices. But the Cardo Packtalk has made it very easy to mute or control the volume of other riders in a group which is a big part of what has changed my opinion of helmet radios. The Cardo Packtalk offers a user friendly-system that is also reliable and simple to install so there is really no reason to ever be a part of a riding group without radios.

Cardo Packtalk Closeup

Bold vs. Slim

The Packtalk Bold is the same body as the previous generation Packtalk but with all of the new upgrades and features of the Packtalk Slim. The unit is about the size of an old style flip phone and must be mounted on the left side of the helmet either with the glue plate or the metal clip.

The Packtalk Slim is the newest design and offers a 6.5 mm thick super sport form unit to attach to the left side of the helmet while the battery pack is located on the back of the helmet at the neckline. The features and functions of the Bold and the Slim are identical, the only difference is in the installation and the final location of the hardware on your helmet.

My preference was certainly the Packtalk Bold model over the Packtalk Slim due to the location of the battery for the Slim. When I tested that model I found that I really didn’t care for the piece attached at the back of my neck.

This might not be an issue for some riders but I have found that on many occasions I ride with the foam neck pad of my helmet resting on the top of my backpack or on the top of the back protector plate of my jacket.

The reason for this position is that I am tucked pretty tightly on my Ducati either to get behind the screen to open my helmet visor for an air exchange or simple to relax in a different position. So for me, the larger single unit mounted on the side of my helmet was far superior to the split units of the Slim configuration.

Shopping Now? We Recommend:

webBikeWorld has worked closely with RevZilla over the years to provide our testers with products to review. In addition to being a great site to shop from, they’re also a great partner.

RevZilla

Free shipping on orders over $40
30-day no-nonsense return policy
Excellent selection of all major brands
Awesome pricing

Buy This Helmet on RevZilla

Amazon

Free shipping (with Amazon Prime)
30-day return policy
Excellent selection
Competitive pricing

Buy This Helmet on Amazon

The Verdict?

I like the Cardo Packtalk system and the ability to choose between the two models, the Packtalk Slim and the Packtalk Bold.

Providing riders with the ability to select from 2 models is always better than forcing riders to all conform to a single model in my mind. If all riders were alike, then bike manufacturers would only build a single bike not numerous models, so kudos to Cardo for taking the same wise approach.

Installing the Cardo

1. Packtalk Bold speaker set

Packtalk Bold speaker set

2. Velcro tab attached to helmet

Velcro tab attached to helmet

3. Speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

Speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

4. Second speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

Second speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

5. Speakers both attached to helmet and wire running across the crown of the helmet

Speakers both attached to helmet and wire running across the crown of the helmet

6. Jack connected and tucked inside the helmet

Jack connected and tucked inside the helmet

7. Microphone attached to velcro tab at front of helmet

Microphone attached to velcro tab at front of helmet

8. Metal bracket mounted to side of helmet- wires fit neatly under the helmet pads

Metal bracket mounted to side of helmet- wires fit neatly under the helmet pads

9. Helmet pads reinserted over wires with speaker exposed

Helmet pads reinserted over wires with speaker exposed

10. With the foam removed to insert the speaker, there can be a void space left once the pads are reinserted in the helmet.

foam removed to insert the speaker

11. This is the foam piece that filled the speaker recess prior to installing the speaker.

foam piece that filled the speaker recess prior to installing the speaker

12. The foam pad can be folded and reinserted into the helmet to fill the void space next to the new speaker.

foam pad can be folded and reinserted into the helmet to fill the void space next to the new speaker.

13. With the foam pad reinserted next to the speaker there is no open area that can catch and fold the top of your ear when you are putting the helmet on.

foam pad reinserted next to the speaker

Pros

  • Complete installation guide included in package
  • Very thorough and detailed installation instructions and diagrams
  • Dynamic mesh communications
  • Good 2-way radio sound quality
  • Great sound quality on radio and music playback
  • Unit integrates well into the helmet with no noticeable discomfort
  • Good battery life
  • Waterproof
  • Offers voice activated function
  • Works well with multiple riders- up to 15

Cons

  • Air/helmet noise can cause an open mic
  • Control wheel can present challenges
  • Pricing could be an issue for some riders

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Cardo Systems Ltd.
  • Price (When Tested): $579.95 for the duo- some discounts were offered online
  • Models: Packtalk Bold or Packtalk Slim
  • Review Date: June 2018

Shopping Now? We Recommend:

webBikeWorld has worked closely with RevZilla over the years to provide our testers with products to review. In addition to being a great site to shop from, they’re also a great partner.

RevZilla

Free shipping on orders over $40
30-day no-nonsense return policy
Excellent selection of all major brands
Awesome pricing

Buy This Helmet on RevZilla

Amazon

Free shipping (with Amazon Prime)
30-day return policy
Excellent selection
Competitive pricing

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Cardo Packtalk Radio Image Gallery

The post Cardo Packtalk Radios Bold and Slim Review Copy appeared first on Web Bike World.

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Cardo Packtalk Radios Bold and Slim Review

A Great Experience with Packtalk Bold and Packtalk Slim

Cardo Packtalk Slim in box

Earlier this year I was offered the opportunity to test the Cardo Packtalk radio system. To be honest, I had never used a radio or communication system when riding and never really felt like I needed to get one. I have always liked the solitude that is found inside my helmet and communication with fellow riders was easy enough with a few basic hand signals. But when the opportunity arose, I thought that this would be a really good chance to review the Packtalk system from the point of view of a total newbie to helmet radios.

I’m not super tech savvy, I’m comfortable with technology but by no means do I own all the newest gadgets and I am not coming into this test process with any preconceived ideas or expectations. My hope is that my finding will speak to all of the riders who are looking at a first radio system as well as those who might be looking to upgrade.

Right from the start, I was very impressed by the Cardo line. I received a Cardo Packtalk Bold Duo and a Cardo Packtalk Slim Duo. Both sets arrived in perfect condition. The box is very well designed as it presents the individual components of the system very clearly.

In most cases, the quality of the packaging is often a good indication of the quality of the product and that is certainly true of the Cardo Packtalk radios. In addition, the box is a great way to store the unit or to keep spare parts as there are options accessories that you can purchase for the system.

Shopping Now? We Recommend:

webBikeWorld has worked closely with RevZilla over the years to provide our testers with products to review. In addition to being a great site to shop from, they’re also a great partner.

RevZilla

Free shipping on orders over $40
30-day no-nonsense return policy
Excellent selection of all major brands
Awesome pricing

Buy This Helmet on RevZilla

Amazon

Free shipping (with Amazon Prime)
30-day return policy
Excellent selection
Competitive pricing

Buy This Helmet on Amazon

Pricing

The Packtalk Bold is available on the Cardo website as a single unit for $329.95 US or as a duo for $579.95 US. The Packtalk Slim has a list price of 329.95 euros for a single unit. Shipping and sales tax are additional and those fees can be determined once you have placed the item in your shopping cart. The Cardo site accepts Visa, Mastercard, American Express and PayPal.

Revzilla also sells both the Packtalk Bold Duo and the Packtalk Slim Duo. Revzilla offers free shipping on orders over $39.95 within the contiguous U.S. as well as a rewards program for most purchases.

Cardo Packtalk Features

Before getting into the specifics of each unit, I wanted to cover some of the general features and benefits of all of the Cardo Packtalk radios. It is also important to note that the technology and the features of the Packtalk Bold and the Packtalk Slim are identical.

One of the best features of these radios is that they offer Dynamic Mesh Communications (DMC). This is a fairly technical advance over other wireless communication systems, but in simple terms, it means that groups can self-form and self-heal.

DMC Application

The application of this is when riders coming into range with other members of their group they automatically join the group. And when riders leave the range of other members they automatically leave the group.

An additional feature is that multiple small subgroups can be functioning independently and then blend into one large group as the smaller subgroups come into range. In the case of the Cardo Packtalk radios, up to 15 riders can connect in the same group. In addition to offering DMC technology, the Packtalk also offers Bluetooth so you can connect to any headset.

Voice Activation

Another major step forward for the Packtalk system is the hands-free operation function. This is the same convenience that is offered by Siri, Alexa and numerous other electronics that consumers have embraced for their homes as well as navigation and other features integrated into a smartphone.

A simple “Hey Cardo” and you have the ability to control all of the critical features as well as the entertainment features of the Packtalk without every removing a hand from your bike. This not only offers additional safety but it can eliminate a lot of frustration as you begin to familiarize yourself with the control surfaces on the Packtalks.

Bells and Whistles

The range of the Packtalks is about one mile under perfect conditions but in average conditions, the range is still close to two-thirds of a mile which is almost double most radio systems on the market.

In addition to the two-way radio feature, the Packtalks also offer the ability to access FM radio, listen to music from a smartphone, share the audio you are listening to with the group, make phone calls, merge a call to the intercom and create a private chat.

The Palktalks also offer a great battery as they are estimated to provide up to 13 hours of talk time and can also be charged while they are in use via a 12-volt charger or a battery pack. And all of these features can be enjoyed rain or shine as all Cardo units are waterproof and offer a 2-year warranty.

The Cardo Packtalk Bold

Cardo Packtalk Bold units charging

I selected the Packtalk Bold set to install in my helmet and my husband’s helmet as we wear Shoei. A complete hard copy of installation guide, the user’s manual and a pocket guide are all included in the box which is very nice. Too many manufacturers are assuming that everyone has access to the Internet to view instructions and installation guides but not Cardo.

All three of these documents are available on the website, Cardo Systems, for future reference.

What’s In The Box

Cardo does a great job of making sure that you have everything that you will need to get your Packtalk radio installed and working perfectly. The box really does include everything that you will need down to the alcohol wipes to ensure that the helmet surface is clean and ready for the installation.

In the box you will find:

  • Noise canceling microphone
  • Hybrid microphone
  • Two speakers
  • Release tab
  • Corded microphone
  • Replacement microphone sponges
  • Pre-moistened alcohol pads
  • Speaker booster pads
  • Velcro pads
  • Hybrid mic clip
  • Glue plate

Installation

You have two options when you are installing the Packtalk Bold. The first choice is to use the metal clip which is inserted between the helmet’s outer shell and inner padding. The second choice is to use the glue plate to mount the unit on the side of the helmet.

The metal clip method worked very well on both Shoei helmets and due to the heat in the Phoenix area, we decided that was a better choice for long-term mounting rather than glue.

Cardo Radio Metal Clip Installation

The Shoei helmets have fully removable padding and cutouts are already in place to mount the speakers. It was a very simple process to remove the pads and then follow the installation instructions provided by Cardo. You can invest as much time as you feel is appropriate when it comes to carefully routing and concealing the wiring. We only spent a few extra minutes on the wiring but it was worth it to have really no visible wires once the installation was completed.

I don’t want to bore anyone with a detailed step by step on the radio installation because the Cardo instructions clearly take you through the process and this article is about evaluating the features and functions once the radios are installed. But I will note that overall the installation was much easier than I had anticipated. The written instructions and diagrams are very clear, making it a pretty painless process which is not at all what I was expecting. T

he one benefit that I had was that I was familiar with removing the pads from my helmet to wash them. So if you are not sure about the pad removal process for your specific helmet, you might want to watch a video of the process online so that you do not inadvertently damage your helmet.

Pairing and Functions

The Cardo mobile app is offered on the Apple App Store and on Google Play. I downloaded the app from Apple while my husband used Google. Neither of us has brand new phones but we had absolutely no issues downloading or operating the Cardo app. And pairing the units is as simple as using any Bluetooth speaker.

The Packtalk Bold operates on a three button system and also a control wheel toward the back of the unit. I did notice that it took me some time to consistently be able to push the control wheel without it turning, but as it turned out I didn’t use that function very often. And knowing about the voice control feature of the Packtalk made me even less concerned about certain button features.

But I did want to be thorough in my evaluation so I pulled out several different types of gloves to test them out. With a pair of gauntlet gloves, which have a fairly thick leather fingertip, I was able to feel the buttons very easily and had no issues with function.

Next, I moved to a thicker textile glove with some Thinsulate on the fingers and that functioned equally as well. The final pair of gloves was a true winter-weight leather glove with a thick lining. This glove made the function a bit more challenging, but I was still able to feel the defined ridge of each button.

I am fairly certain that with more frequent use and familiarity with the buttons, any rider would be comfortable using the Packtalk Bold even in winter weight gloves.

Voice Commands

My concern with the button function became less of an issue as I grew more familiar with the voice command function of the Packtalk Bold. The key phrase for the unit is “Hey Cardo” just as with Google or Siri.

Any time that the unit is on you can use the voice commands to access the radio, play music, adjust the volume or mute the audio. In addition, you can speed dial, redial, answer or ignore phone calls.

And one of the most functional features is the ability to check your battery status. “Hey Cardo, battery status” and you know that you are good to go on the power of that you need to take a break and uses the charge on the go feature to top off your battery.

Shopping Now? We Recommend:

webBikeWorld has worked closely with RevZilla over the years to provide our testers with products to review. In addition to being a great site to shop from, they’re also a great partner.

RevZilla

Free shipping on orders over $40
30-day no-nonsense return policy
Excellent selection of all major brands
Awesome pricing

Buy This Helmet on RevZilla

Amazon

Free shipping (with Amazon Prime)
30-day return policy
Excellent selection
Competitive pricing

Buy This Helmet on Amazon

First Test Ride

I wasn’t really sure what to expect for my first ride with a radio in my helmet, but I quickly learned that I really like the ability to speak to the person I am riding with. But I also learned that we both have a tendency to comment on the driving skills of some of the motorist around us. So I needed to remember that what I used to mumble sometimes not so quietly to myself was now being tossed into my husband’s helmet and vice versa.

On surface streets, the sound was far better than I expected. We were never far enough apart to lose the connection even at a range of about half a mile.

Moving onto the highway we were still able to carry on a conversation or to make short comments without any difficulty hearing or understanding each other. At a higher rate of speed, the wind noise was a bit more noticeable. I found that opening and closing the top vent on my helmet had no real impact on the sound quality but opening the vent on the front of my helmet did decrease the quality of my transmissions.

Another factor to consider is that we tested the Packtalks in Phoenix in the summertime so we did not have the chin curtain installed in either helmet. That would eliminate some of the air-flow sounds and increase the sound quality a bit I am guessing. That being said, the quality of the helmet is going to have an impact on the sound quality of the Packtalk system. A helmet that is engineered to be quieter will obviously have better sound quality for those whom you are speaking to and will allow you to hear the speakers more clearly as well. So take that into consideration when creating your expectations for the Packtalk and when evaluating the performance of your system.

Overall, I was very happy with the quality of the sound and the function of the Packtalk Bold Duo in our first ride. Being new to the concept, we were only barely scratching the surface of what these radios offer by using the two-way radios but we were very happy with that first step.

A Second Test

On the second test ride, we were meeting 2 other riders who had installed the Packtalk Slim Duo. The units had all been installed and established in the pack prior to the ride so that we could just randomly meet up. One feature that is great about the Packtalk is that two different groups from the same pack can be communicating and then merge into a single group as they enter range with one another. So in our case, each couple could be talking and then we were able to all hear each other as we came into range.

We were on a highway and had decent vision so we could see the other two riders as we approached. At somewhere around half a mile or a little more, our two groups merged into a single group and we could all talk. After the ride, as the other couple split off, we returned to the two separate groups once we were around a mile apart.

During the test ride, one person made a phone call and then rejoined the group with no issues. We also had one member use the speed dial voice command to call another member of the group. With both people on the call in helmets and at high speed the sound quality was a little low but still very functional and understandable.

Additional Insights

In addition to riding in groups, I have used the Packtalk Bold on a lot of rides when I was by myself to test the other features such as the radio and music playback from my phone. The only issue that I have come across has been related to the location of my phone during the ride. Having my phone in my back pocket caused a lot of connectivity issues in the music and in “dropped” calls.

After discovering this issue, I began carrying my phone in either the inside front pocket of my jacket or in a top zipper compartment of my backpack. In both cases, the phone is about one or two feet from my helmet and the function has been perfect.

Apparently, the density of my butt was the issues for the Bluetooth, not the distance so a jacket pocket, front coat pocket or having the phone mounted on the handlebar of your bike would all maintain the 2ish foot distance that works perfectly.

Having made some longer rides in groups of four or more without any type of radio, I am very certain that I would much rather have the Cardo Packtalk system for my next long ride. It just makes it very simple to communicate things like a slight change in route or a need for fuel. In addition, having the ability to communicate at a distance greater than a line of sight or half a mile is a great safety feature in the event of an accident or other equipment issues.

The functions offered by the Packtalk Bold and the Packtalk Slim are huge and range from very functional for communication purposes to very much luxuries such as listening to the radio or stored music. And the best part by far is that both of these benefits are integrated into a single, easy to use system. Having spent just weeks exploring the bells and whistles of the new Packtalk radios, I am more convinced than ever that it would take many more months to fully put these radios through their paces and become intimate with the function and features that they offer.

Originally I would have been against having radios because I like to put on my helmet and not hear a phone, radio or other voices. But the Cardo Packtalk has made it very easy to mute or control the volume of other riders in a group which is a big part of what has changed my opinion of helmet radios. The Cardo Packtalk offers a user friendly-system that is also reliable and simple to install so there is really no reason to ever be a part of a riding group without radios.

Cardo Packtalk Closeup

Bold vs. Slim

The Packtalk Bold is the same body as the previous generation Packtalk but with all of the new upgrades and features of the Packtalk Slim. The unit is about the size of an old style flip phone and must be mounted on the left side of the helmet either with the glue plate or the metal clip.

The Packtalk Slim is the newest design and offers a 6.5 mm thick super sport form unit to attach to the left side of the helmet while the battery pack is located on the back of the helmet at the neckline. The features and functions of the Bold and the Slim are identical, the only difference is in the installation and the final location of the hardware on your helmet.

My preference was certainly the Packtalk Bold model over the Packtalk Slim due to the location of the battery for the Slim. When I tested that model I found that I really didn’t care for the piece attached at the back of my neck.

This might not be an issue for some riders but I have found that on many occasions I ride with the foam neck pad of my helmet resting on the top of my backpack or on the top of the back protector plate of my jacket.

The reason for this position is that I am tucked pretty tightly on my Ducati either to get behind the screen to open my helmet visor for an air exchange or simple to relax in a different position. So for me, the larger single unit mounted on the side of my helmet was far superior to the split units of the Slim configuration.

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The Verdict?

I like the Cardo Packtalk system and the ability to choose between the two models, the Packtalk Slim and the Packtalk Bold.

Providing riders with the ability to select from 2 models is always better than forcing riders to all conform to a single model in my mind. If all riders were alike, then bike manufacturers would only build a single bike not numerous models, so kudos to Cardo for taking the same wise approach.

Installing the Cardo

1. Packtalk Bold speaker set

Packtalk Bold speaker set

2. Velcro tab attached to helmet

Velcro tab attached to helmet

3. Speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

Speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

4. Second speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

Second speaker attached to velcro tab in helmet

5. Speakers both attached to helmet and wire running across the crown of the helmet

Speakers both attached to helmet and wire running across the crown of the helmet

6. Jack connected and tucked inside the helmet

Jack connected and tucked inside the helmet

7. Microphone attached to velcro tab at front of helmet

Microphone attached to velcro tab at front of helmet

8. Metal bracket mounted to side of helmet- wires fit neatly under the helmet pads

Metal bracket mounted to side of helmet- wires fit neatly under the helmet pads

9. Helmet pads reinserted over wires with speaker exposed

Helmet pads reinserted over wires with speaker exposed

10. With the foam removed to insert the speaker, there can be a void space left once the pads are reinserted in the helmet.

foam removed to insert the speaker

11. This is the foam piece that filled the speaker recess prior to installing the speaker.

foam piece that filled the speaker recess prior to installing the speaker

12. The foam pad can be folded and reinserted into the helmet to fill the void space next to the new speaker.

foam pad can be folded and reinserted into the helmet to fill the void space next to the new speaker.

13. With the foam pad reinserted next to the speaker there is no open area that can catch and fold the top of your ear when you are putting the helmet on.

foam pad reinserted next to the speaker

Pros

  • Complete installation guide included in package
  • Very thorough and detailed installation instructions and diagrams
  • Dynamic mesh communications
  • Good 2-way radio sound quality
  • Great sound quality on radio and music playback
  • Unit integrates well into the helmet with no noticeable discomfort
  • Good battery life
  • Waterproof
  • Offers voice activated function
  • Works well with multiple riders- up to 15

Cons

  • Air/helmet noise can cause an open mic
  • Control wheel can present challenges
  • Pricing could be an issue for some riders

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Cardo Systems Ltd.
  • Price (When Tested): $579.95 for the duo- some discounts were offered online
  • Models: Packtalk Bold or Packtalk Slim
  • Review Date: June 2018

Shopping Now? We Recommend:

webBikeWorld has worked closely with RevZilla over the years to provide our testers with products to review. In addition to being a great site to shop from, they’re also a great partner.

RevZilla

Free shipping on orders over $40
30-day no-nonsense return policy
Excellent selection of all major brands
Awesome pricing

Buy This Helmet on RevZilla

Amazon

Free shipping (with Amazon Prime)
30-day return policy
Excellent selection
Competitive pricing

Buy This Helmet on Amazon

Cardo Packtalk Radio Image Gallery

The post Cardo Packtalk Radios Bold and Slim Review appeared first on Web Bike World.

Categories
Accessory Reviews Cruise Control Cruise Control Hands On Review Gear Reviews MCCruise Motorcycle Accessory & Parts Motorcycle Cruise Control Reviews Other Motorcycle Blogs review Web Bike World

MCCruise TBW Aftermarket Cruise Control Hands On Review

***My Pick of the Year So Far***

The Rationale

When I discuss which products to review with our content manager I push for:

  • Ones I hear other people recommend strongly in forums or in person.
  • Products I personally believe will be useful or have a clear, positive impact.
  • The more expensive ones. I want us to take the financial risk so you don’t have to.

The MCCruise system fits this criterion exactly. To this point, I haven’t reviewed a product that I like or will appreciate having on my bike more than this one. It’s not even close.

I’ll cut to the chase and reveal that the only reasons MCCruise didn’t get 5 stars out of 5 come down to the cost of buying the system being fairly substantial ($550 which is a lot of cheddar) and the fact it does take moderate mechanical skill to install it.

Some people might also point out that the control switch assembly is too big and will ruin the look of their bike as well. I’m on the fence about that one.

FYI: ***The kit only took about a week to arrive here from Australia and I had to pay $25 of duty as well., just FYI.

Not a Throttle Lock

Practically everyone has at one time or another spent $20 to $100 on some variety of throttle lock in an attempt to save their wrist and hand from cramping up on long trips. I’ve tried more than a few myself and they’ve always left me wanting and unsatisfied.

The MCCruise is a sophisticated electronic add-on that works the same way the one in your car does… only smoother and better.

This review is for the Throttle By Wire compatible MCCruise system made for KTM 1190 Adventure bikes, but there are also numerous kits available for bikes that have cable operated throttle assemblies instead. They’re quite different with the cable systems costing more to buy and being more complicated to install because of the need for an actuator servo to be installed correctly in order to work safely.

This means that there’s an MCCruise available for pretty much every bike on the market.

The Overall Experience

I installed the throttle by wire system in my 2014 KTM 1190 Adventure S in about three sessions lasting 2 hours each. I think that’s roughly how long it took but I’m not totally sure. I was battling illness and sub-zero temperatures in my garage which made me have to take breaks for a couple of days before coming back to it. Add to that my OCD tendencies forcing me to wait for parts I had ordered, needed to finish other repairs/maintenance while I had the gas tank removed like:

  • Cleaning the engine air filter
  • Removing the emissions canister
  • Replacing both fuel filters
  • Installing a kickstand relocation kit
  • New chain and sprockets
  • New mounting bolts for the bash plate under the engine

What can I say? I wanted to make sure my bike was totally ready to go for riding season. My point in telling you this is that the kit wasn’t difficult to install, just a little time-consuming. I’ll go into greater detail about the installation later. First, let’s talk about the performance of the MCCruise.

A “Quick” 160 Mile Test Drive

When the weather finally warmed up enough in this unusually cold month of April for me to contemplate road testing the MCCruise, there was still plenty of melting snow and ice on the ground outside my garage.

I steadied my nerves and bulldozed my way through the 4-inch deep pile of snow and ice built up in front of my garage and made it to dry pavement. It was an uneasy slip and slide lasting about 35 feet to the road, but then I was free of winter’s grasp! I’m now looking at replacing my Continental Attack 2 tires with something that would have an easier time to get traction in snow as a result.

During winter here in Alberta, city snow removal crews throw down copious amounts of pea-sized gravel to give better traction to cars traveling on the snow and ice covered roads. That gravel is still very much thereafter everything melts and it creates deadly mayhem for motorcycles every spring. I was very much aware of this danger and tried to ride accordingly once I reached the clear asphalt. That’s tough to do on a bike as powerful as my KTM and I wisely took it out of my preferred SPORT mode in favor of STREET.

My plan was just to ride a big lap around the outskirts of the city I live in, lasting about 25 minutes and allowing me to adequately test the MCCruise at a variety of speeds, and on differing terrain.

Red Light?

As I got out of town and onto roads where I could safely engage the system to try it out I was caught by surprise when a red indicator light appeared beside the ON button after pushing it. For whatever reason, the red color made me think something was wrong or not working because I didn’t remember reading anything about it in the instructions to indicate that was normal.

I decided to throw caution to the wind and risked pushing the SET button.

Scenes from the old Stephen King movie Maximum Overdrive began flashing through my mind. I briefly imagined the KTM taking me on a terrifying and unstoppable ride right up to my bike’s insane top speed. Would I perish in a fiery crash brought on by my own incompetent installation of the MCCruise system? A glitch in the programming maybe?

Oh well, at least I would die doing something everyone would remember and talk about for years after. Remember that crazy motorcycle writer guy crashing at 200 mph into that field full of cows outside town?

What an idiot he was thinking he should have cruise control on a 1190.

The Red Light Means MCCruise Is On, But Not Engaged… Phew!

My irrational thoughts disappeared after the red light turned yellow and the bike very smoothly locked at the desired speed and stayed there until I squeezed the brake lever or pulled in the clutch just as advertised.

You know how most cruise systems jerk when you hit the SET button and let off the gas abruptly? MCCruise doesn’t do that. It’s super smooth when activating, but immediately drops off when you cancel it. Full credit for making this a truly motorcycle friendly system. No herky-jerky on a motorcycle, please and thank you. Well done!

Solid and Accurate

I was so pleased with the initial test that I HAD to ride longer than just a lap around Airdrie, so I headed west towards a huge hill that slopes upwards at a 45-degree angle for at least a couple of miles to see how well the speed would hold. I set the cruise at 75 mph at the bottom of the hill and it didn’t waver even 1 mph in the ascent!

I ended up riding further west into the still snow-capped Canadian Rockies that I love riding in so much. I logged a total of 160 miles to make up for some of the long winters I had to endure without any riding time. The MCCruise was flawless and completely earned my trust and confidence over that time and distance.

How Low Will It Go?

Most cruise control systems won’t activate until you’re going faster than about 25 mph and I was curious if that applied to MCCruise. After some experimentation, I found that I was able to activate the MCCruise at a surprising 18 mph as it turns out. That’s going to come in handy riding through construction zones this summer.

A Happy New Owner

Up until then, I was seriously considering selling my 1190 and buying a different bike equipped with factory cruise control. No more! That’s going to save me a pile of money and let me keep a bike that I’ll now really enjoy a lot more on long rides.

The MCCruise Brothers

The minds behind MCCruise are two Australian brothers named Tony and Frank Guymer. The testing data they provided me with showed that at 60 mph there’s almost zero variation in speed even when riding up big hills. My testing confirmed those numbers. It’s really well thought out and engineered.

Tony and Frank were easy to reach and prompt to answer questions via email or phone. Impressive considering they’re half a world away “Down Under”. I found them to be very passionate about ensuring their product is safe and reliable.

Firmware and BlueTooth

Tony informed me that coming in the next month or so you’ll be able to buy a Bluetooth connector to add to your MCCruise system to further enhance it This connector combined with an MCCruise app on your phone will allow pairing of the two devices.

When improvements to the firmware are developed by the Guymers you’ll be able to update the system this way.

Even better, the app will display your TRUE speed instead of just what your speedometer reads if you pair it with your cellphone and GPS app. The MCCruise app can be set up to warn you if you go over the speed limit for the road you’re traveling on. That could help save you money on speeding tickets and justify buying the system.

Intelligent Cruise Control

Tony Guymer told me that he and Frank had successfully programmed the cruise control system to automatically adjust the bike’s speed on its own to match the GPS road data. They chose not to release this feature to the public because the road speed limit data isn’t always accurate. All the same that is pretty cool to think this kind of potentially “intelligent” cruise control is possible with MCCruise.

The Installation

Now we get down to the nitty-gritty: getting the kit on your bike.

Instruction Manual

The instruction manual is written in a clear step-by-step style and has useful black and white photos in it for reference. It covers:

  • Removal of all parts necessary for MCCruise installation
  • Routing of the two wiring harnesses and where to attach tie straps
  • How to disassemble wiring connectors on the bike and in the MCCruise harness
  • Wiring color diagrams and what sensors and switches they correspond to. This also functions as a basic wiring schematic for the system and can be used for troubleshooting needs down the road
  • Calibration of the system when the install is completed
  • How to safely bench test the system in your garage before taking it out on the road

It Turns Out I Read “Aussie” Fluently

I impressed myself with my complete comprehension of the Australian dialect the manual was written in and how much it resembles our English language.

This page in the manual lists everything that comes in the kit and provides part numbers in case anything is missing. Everything in the kit gets used in the installation, including the packing foam. I found that out the hard way when out of habit I threw it away after opening the box weeks before I installed the kit. I didn’t realize that chunk of foam is used underneath the MCCruise electronic control module for support when installing on the bike. Oops. Good thing I had some extra foam kicking around.

TPS Harness and Main Harness Installation

There are two harnesses to be installed that run from just underneath the handlebar riser mounting clamps along the right side of the frame under the gas tank, all the way back to underneath the passenger seat area.

The TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) harness installation begins with removing the left side mirror and sandwiching the control switch housing mounting bracket in between it and the mirror perch (photo above). You have the option of a normal or high mount depending on what configuration you have to work around on your bike’s left handlebar.

I installed the standard height bracket as pictured above. There’s still plenty of room to use the buttons on the left handlebar.

You can alternately mount it underneath the left handlebar if you prefer as shown in this photo below. Looking back now that may have been a more discreet location for it.

The MCCruise TPS harness has two connectors on it that match the TPS connectors on the bike’s harness. You need to connect them in between the two halves of the bike’s connector.

In order to get access to the bike’s TPS connector, you need to remove the gas tank and the left side intake tube. Even after that, it’s a challenge to be able to cram your hands into the small opening in the frame available to access it. The instructions say to remove both intake or snorkel tubes, but I managed it with only the left side removed.

Photo Above: This shows the view looking from above at the small opening in the frame to access the TPS connector.

The bike connectors are all fairly difficult to pull apart using only one and a half hands while working through only a small opening, but it can be done if you’re persistent and use a very small screwdriver to help by pushing down on the locking tab.

Photo Above: The mess that is the TPS and Main MCCruise harnesses that are installed in the jumble of connectors located behind the triple tree clamp area.

In addition to the TPS connector, you’ll also have to pull apart the ones for the front brake and clutch switches located in the same small area and plug in MCCruise harness connectors. After doing up everything in this small area you’ll have twice as many connectors jammed in the space just flopping around. I wrapped tie wraps around the whole collection and secured them in an ugly looking ball to the frame. As you can see in the photo above it’s not pretty, but should hold together.

Now it’s time to route both harnesses towards the back of the bike along the inside of the frame between it and the airbox.

This photo shows the gap between the frame and airbox where the two harnesses have to be routed from the front of the bike to the back. The two steel tubes on the left of the photo make a good anchoring point and guide for the harnesses to follow as you route them.

That bundle of shiny wires is the TPS and main harnesses coming from the front and running along the right side frame all the way to the back of the bike where the MCCruise control module will be housed underneath and behind the passenger seat. You have to loosen off the orange body panel screws on the lower part of the photo in order to route the harnesses under the frame and then up and over it to the control module. Do all this while bearing in mind where the seat will land on the frame so that it won’t pinch the harnesses.

There’s also a wire with a clear plastic connector coming off the main harness that plugs into the diagnostic plug you see sitting on top of the battery in the photo above and another that you route to the rear brake switch located under the bike’s electronic control module.

Note: ***MCCruise offers a pass-through patch harness to support other accessories or “dongles” already plugged into the diagnostic port. Other add-ons can live downstream of the MCCruise connection with this patch harness installed allowing the MCCruise and another performance-enhancing system to operate simultaneously. No worries, Mate!

The final yellow wire off the main harness runs across the frame of the bike above the rear shock to end up connected to one of the spark plug coil connectors as seen in the photo below. Again, the way to do this is clearly explained in the installation instructions.

Install The MCCruise Brain

This is the “brainbox” for the MCCruise system that makes the magic happen. You’ll have to unlock the large, rectangular connector that plugs into it and insert several wires in the correct pin holes before you connect it to the brainbox (electronic control module if you want to use proper nomenclature). The instructions show and explain clearly how to do this, thankfully.

Once that’s done you can stick the brainbox to the roof of the pocket in the black plastic body panel at the rear of the bike. The instructions call it a “duckbill” if I recall correctly. Velcro tape is included to hold it there and then you stuff the packing foam from the kit (that you wisely didn’t throw away) under it to keep it in place. A perfect hiding place for this important computer module to stay safe.

That shiny black wire in the photo above with the clear plastic spade connector on it also needs to be plugged in to supply power to the system from the bike. You’ll find two wires with these spade connectors just hanging out in the back of that body panel waiting to put power into whatever you decide to connect to them.

Removing the Emissions Canister: Optional

In the last photo, you’ll notice two hoses on the left of the power wire, one of them has a blue dot on it and a bolt stuck at the end of it to plug it off.

Those hoses came off the emissions canister which I chose to remove from the bike in order to make room for the MCCruise control module and free up the area where the bike toolkit is supposed to be kept too. I don’t need the canister in the area I live to comply with emissions regulations. You, on the other hand, may need to keep it in there depending on where you live. Check and see what your local laws regarding fuel tank emissions are before removing this canister.

This photo above shows the canister in its mounting bracket and how it would take up all the space in the duckbill area.

The hose with the blue paint on it in the photo before the last one came off the nipple in the center of the canister. That’s the one you plug with a bolt. It leads to the PCV on the left side of the engine. You can verify this by trying to blow air into the hose. You shouldn’t be able to flow any air into it if it’s the PCV line.

The other hose leads to the right side of the gas tank cap area and is a breather. If you blow in it air will flow out the end of the hose at the front of the bike if your gas tank is removed or into the tank if it’s still installed at that moment.

Trace the breather hose back to the area just in front of the bike’s battery/computer area and cut it there as seen in the photo above. Tuck the rear portion of the hose down out of the way. Feed the front portion of the hose back towards where it connects to the gas tank cap and then re-route it so that it runs straight down along the frame somewhere so that it can drain anything that comes out of the gas tank breather without pouring it onto the hot exhaust anywhere.

Doing it this way leaves the option open of putting everything back the way it was using a barbed fitting between the two cut sections of the breather hose if in the future you need or want to put the canister back in the bike. Don’t worry, removing the canister and plugging the PCV hose won’t damage anything or throw any error codes on the bike.

Final Checks

You should have the control switch box in place, all the wiring run now and the computer installed. Use the supplied tie straps to anchor the harnesses down tightly and so that they won’t get pinched by any moving parts of the seat when installed.

Now it’s time to check your work for errors and calibrate the MCCruise to your bike’s throttle position sensor. This is a way of making sure the cruise control will work without having to risk a failure while flying down the highway on the bike.

Self Diagnostic Mode and Calibration

The process is explained in the instruction manual of how to put the system in test mode using buttons on the control switch while watching the little LED light beside the ON/OFF button.

This video goes through the installation process and the way to test and calibrate the system.

Conclusion

I Wholeheartedly Endorse it

This Throttle By Wire MCCruise system is a super smart add-on for bikes like the KTM 1190 Adventure S or R, Honda VFR1200X or even the new 2018 Honda Africa Twin.

These bikes and many others have TBW technology on them but still no cruise control option from the factory.

How manufacturers can seriously say these are touring/adventure bikes and not provide cruise control is a riddle I’ll never solve. Some are coming around now and we’re seeing cruise control on newer KTM bikes for example, but this isn’t the case with many others. The legendary sport touring Kawasaki Concours has never come with cruise control for example.

Luckily MCCruise is a viable option that can make you as happy as I am now that it’s on my machine.

There have been issues reported with some of the earlier MCCruise systems for cable actuated throttles. Those systems used engine vacuum to control the movement of the throttle and from what I’m told Ethanol gasoline was leaving gummy deposits in the system causing problems with them. Those issues have since been resolved by Tony and Frank with some preventative measures and improved new designs like the mini electric servo systems.

The new TBW systems have no worries mate because they have no moving parts to gum up. If you have a TBW setup on your bike and no cruise control, the MCCruise is a no-brainer.

Pros

  • Cutting-edge technology
  • More accurate and smoother than OEM cruise control systems
  • Upgradable firmware and BlueTooth connectivity coming soon
  • Compact and reasonably easy to install
  • Self-diagnostic mode for troubleshooting
  • Customized cruise control kits are available to fit nearly any motorcycle

Cons

  • Expensive to buy
  • People with no mechanical skill will need to pay to install the system
  • Large control switch may clash with the looks of some motorcycles

Specs

  • Manufacturer: Motorcycle Cruise Controls (MCCruise)
  • Price (When Tested): Approx $550 (tax, duty, shipping incl.)
  • Made In: Australia
  • Alternative model: Mini Electric Servo Controlled Systems
  • Review Date: April 14, 2018

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